French Macarons

macaron 1

I’ve been baking consistently for about six years and I find myself making the same treats over and over again. While practice makes perfect, I started getting bored of making cheesecake, cinnamon rolls, and cupcakes all the time.

To remedy my ennui, I emailed close friends to solicit their favorite desserts. Perhaps they love a dessert that I haven’t tried yet. To show my appreciation for their suggestions, I gave them a sample of what I made.
One friend immediately wrote back saying his favorite dessert was French macarons. Finally a challenge!

As seasoned bakers know, it is vital to conduct research prior to making something new. It saves both time and ingredients.

I scoured the Internet, reading multiple recipes and watching various videos to learn how to make these tricky cookies. Afterwards, I decided that Beth’s Foolproof French Macarons tutorial was the best recipe to follow. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJ636Y8N6E8) Beth gave me the directions necessary to ensure my macarons had feet on the first try!

macaron 2

French Macarons

3 egg whites at room temperature
¼ cup white granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
2 cups confectioners’ sugar (200 g)
1 cup almond flour (120 g)
Gel food coloring (optional)

French macarons are a finicky cookie that require a keen eye and patience.
Start by whipping your room temperature egg whites until they’re foamy, then add salt, cream of tartar and white sugar. Whip until they form a peak that stands upright.

Then add the gel food coloring. Add more than you think you need since the color fades in the cooking process.

Sift almond flour and powder sugar. Fold the flour/sugar mixture into the egg white mixture until is like lava slowly falling off the spatula. If you under-mix, your cookies will crack. If you over mix, they won’t have feet (the little ridges on the bottom of the cookie that indicate a successful bake).

Pipe dollops of batter of the same size on parchment paper. Bang the tray on the counter to release any air bubbles, and then let the tray rest for at least 20 minutes so the batter is tacky to the touch.

Put the tray in a pre-heated 300 degree F oven. Bake for 20 minutes. Afterwards, let the cookies cool completely before sandwiching them together with jelly or buttercream.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s